"Enter his gates with thanksgiving, and his courts with praise. Give thanks to him, bless his name." --Psalm 100:4

Browsing News Entries

Browsing News Entries

From Mary to Philip Neri: Lessons in Detached Cooperation

“All of God’s purposes are to the good, although we may not always understand this we can trust in it.” — St. Philip Neri Philip Neri was neither the first nor the last saint to remind us that God’s purposes, though far beyond our comprehension, are “always to the good” and trustworthy, but he said it perfectly and succinctly. If we have faith, Neri’s words apply a mysterious balm of consolation during challenging times, times when we don’t understand why sad, harrowing, senseless, tragic, or just plain weird things are happening to us or to others. It is a balm of reassurance—one that reminds us that we are given opportunities to cooperate with a divine plan that is yet unfolding, and thus to co-create within that plan as best we…

Why Matter Matters: The Eucharist as Center of a Culture (Part II)

The following is the second half of a discussion with Dr. Timothy O’Malley, the Director of Education at the McGrath Institute for Church Life and Academic Director of the Notre Dame Center for Liturgy, on his latest book Real Presence: What Does It Mean and Why Does It Matter? A helpful guide for catechists and theology teachers, the book is also an accessible read for anyone seeking to understand the Church’s doctrines on the Eucharist and the role devotional life plays in forming a Eucharistic worldview. (You can read the first part of the discussion here.) Robert Mixa: In the Scripture section of your book, you focus on the importance of divine dwelling. And I really liked how you show that to be a central theme from Genesis to the book of Revelation: God desires to dwell with…

Why Matter Matters: The Eucharist as Center of a Culture (Part I)

The following is the first half of a very pleasant discussion with Dr. Timothy O’Malley, the Director of Education at the McGrath Institute for Church Life and Academic Director of the Notre Dame Center for Liturgy, on his latest book Real Presence: What Does It Mean and Why Does It Matter? The book is a helpful guide for catechists and theology teachers, but it is also an accessible read for anyone seeking to understand the Church’s Eucharistic doctrines and the role devotional life plays in forming a Eucharistic worldview.  Robert Mixa: Tim, let’s begin with the findings of a 2019 Pew Research report which said that only 31 percent of Catholics believe that the Eucharist is the actual Body and Blood of Christ. I remember there was concern about the way the survey questions were phrased and whether…

Bob Ross: Teaching Joy, Even Amid the Shadows

Joy is a common word in the Bible and in Christian tradition, but—like many biblical and theological words—joy does not always mean what most people might assume. It’s not a synonym for happiness, nor is joy the same thing as optimism. In Matthew 28:8, we are told that Mary Magdalene and the other Mary “left the tomb quickly with fear and great joy.” Joy does not replace negative feelings, but rather accompanies them into the heart of God. Joy is fleeting on our side of eternity. Jesus tells the disciples in John 16:22, “you have pain now; but I will see you again, and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you.” St. James tells us, “Whenever you face trials of any kind, consider it nothing but joy” (James 1:2). St. Paul talks…

Scrip sales

Scrip is now being sold at St. Anne's School office during school hours. Please call or email Jan in the office if you would like to place an order. It is no longer available at CornerStone Bank. Scrip is also sold at St. Anne's...

Tolkien and Peter Pan: Death and the Desire for Deathlessness

This piece is an excerpt adapted from Holly Ordway’s Tolkien’s Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages, Chapter 6. In one of the rare instances when Tolkien said what The Lord of the Rings was “about,” he explained that “it is about Death and the desire for deathlessness.” Tolkien’s approach to this topic provides the fitting groundwork for reflection on this anniversary of his death on September 2, 1973. We can gain some insight into Tolkien’s views by means of another literary creation: the deathless boy called Peter Pan, the creation of J.M. Barrie. Although we might now be more familiar with the Disney version, Peter first appeared in the 1902 novel The Little White Bird, followed by a stage play in 1904, and then subsequently by two…

Social Media and Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places

Our time spent on social media is time spent looking for love.

The Killers’ Maturing Voice Speaks for the Times with “Pressure Machine”

If you’re familiar with the American band The Killers, it could be due to their popular ballad “Mr. Brightside,” which just might be the “Sweet Caroline” of the millennial generation. Their debut album, Hot Fuss, was the anthem of my college days, and Sam’s Town from 2006 was another musical triumph. Their new release, Pressure Machine, ends a recent cycle of hit-or-miss albums. Musically, it’s the strongest and most cohesive album since Sam’s Town, and lyrically, it has a poetic maturity that moves well beyond its predecessors. Pressure Machine is a heartbreaking album with moving themes woven throughout to highlight the struggles of small-town life in America and disenchantment with faith. The Killers frontman, Brandon Flowers, was raised…

Applefest Silent Auction

The Applefest Committee is looking for additional items for this year's silent auction. Please contact Abby Lewis [email protected] if you would like to make a donation. Thank you.

Is Love Possible? The Witness of St. Maximilian Kolbe

When I was hired to work at Mundelein Seminary at the University of St. Mary of the Lake, Bishop Barron (then the rector of the seminary) was renovating the St. John Paul II Chapel for the seminarians. He had new stained glass windows of several saints installed in the chapel, one of which was dedicated to St. Maximilian Kolbe. The window depicts Kolbe with a long beard, which he grew while he was a missionary to Japan, as the Japanese identified beards with wisdom. In his hand is a copy of the Rycerz Niepokalanej (Knight of the Immaculate), a monthly magazine that, despite opposition from Nazis and Communists, continues to this day. Above the Polish title is the Japanese title. Kolbe published the magazine in Japanese as part of his missionary efforts in that country. All around Kolbe are images from his life: the…